Password Management Tips

Are you using the same passwords for your email accounts as well as other accounts with sensitive information about you?

We see many customers that have been hacked and need our help. Well, you can imagine the advice we give and I hope to this blog helps you too. So here are some basic tips:

Are you using the same passwords for your email accounts as well as other accounts with sensitive information about you?

We see many customers that have been hacked and need our help. Well, you can imagine the advice we give and I hope to this blog helps you too. So here are some basic tips:

 

  • Change passwords that are too predictable like these most common ones:
  1. 123456
  2. password
  3. 12345678
  4. abc123
  5. 123abc
  • Create unique passwords for every website you visit. There are many ways to generate difficult to hack passwords. Here are some tips to get them:
  1. Find a Password Manager. These are very effective for those that need the extra security. These usually have a small fee associated with them. They can work with your web browser or smart phone.
  2. Do-it-Yourself passwords with a twist. Try to get 10 to 12 characters and mix in letters and numbers as well as Caps.  For a unique ContactPC password you might use c0n7Ac7pCCr. I have used a combination of lowercase, uppercase, numbers and my initial. Have fun with it.
  • Make a list of your passwords and other important information in Excel or Google Docs but remember to Password Protect These! This is a very secure option that you can manage on your own. Again, there are Password Managers available for those who need the extra help. It’s up to you to get these stored and secured; otherwise you will be constantly changing your forgotten passwords. You can also use a Flash Drive with encryption software if preferred. Here are a few extra items to consider storing for yourself or loved ones:
  1. Vehicle license plates and VIN numbers.
  2. Social Security account numbers.
  3. Credit Card account numbers-etc.
  4. Licenses for software and other items.
  5. Various Membership account information.
  6. Frequent Flier information.
  7. Other Critical information (just in case).

 

Worried about remembering all those passwords? Most websites with secure access will let you save your unique account information into your web browser so you won’t have to enter this information again. Be sure to password protect computer or phone if you choose this option.

If you have read to this point you may have some homework to do. With all of the malicious hacking we will all encounter, we suggest you start soon.

We offer a free consultation. Let us know if we can help 720.443.4400.

Have fun with it!

Chip